Lot

211

ATTICA, Athens. Circa 469/5-460 BC. AR Dekadrachm (31.5mm, 43.38 g, 3h). Head of Athena right,

In Classical Numismatic Group Triton XXII Auction

This auction is live! You need to be registered and approved to bid at this auction.
You have been outbid. For the best chance of winning, increase your maximum bid.
Your bid or registration is pending approval with the auctioneer. Please check your email account for more details.
Unfortunately, your registration has been declined by the auctioneer. You can contact the auctioneer on +1 7173909194 for more information.
You are the current highest bidder! To be sure to win, log in for the live auction broadcast on or increase your max bid.
Leave a bid now! Your registration has been successful.
Sorry, bidding has ended on this item. We have thousands of new lots everyday, start a new search.
Bidding on this auction has not started. Please register now so you are approved to bid when auction starts.
Auctioneer has chosen not to publish the price of this lot
New York , New York
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 469/5-460 BC. AR Dekadrachm (31.5mm, 43.38 g, 3h). Head of Athena right, with frontal eye, wearing single-pendant earring, necklace with pendants, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over the visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing facing, wings spread; olive sprig and crescent to upper left, A-?-E clockwise around from upper right; all within incuse square. Fischer-Bossert, Athenian 24a (O14/R23’) = Stannard & Fischer-Bossert pp. 8–18 (this coin); Starr Group II.C (unlisted dies); Seltman 445–52; HGC 4, 1585; SNG Berry 641; BMC 40 = ACGC 188; Gulbenkian 515 = Jameson 2080; Hirsch 1272; Kraay & Hirmer 357–8; Zhuyuetang 31 (same obv. die). EF, attractive deep gray tone. with iridescence around the devices. Superb metal quality for issue, and perfectly centered strike.


From the Spina Collection. Ex North American Collection of Numismatic Masterpieces (Triton X, 9 January 2007), lot 230.

The present coin represents a splendid example of this magnificent ancient work of art, with a surface quality far exceeding that of the specimens offered over the past several years. It exhibits clear flow lines, very sharp detail junctures, and a crispness often lacking in such large module ancient coins. Additionally, the aesthetic quality of the reverse is exceptional, an extremely powerful design with a well defined and expressive owl in full glory.

The historical context of the Athenian dekadrachms, as well as concomitant tetradrachms and didrachms of the same class, has been the matter of extended debate. Much of the early confusion stems from a passage in Herodotos, who said that Athens paid ten drachms to each of its citizens for surpluses from the Laurion mines (7.144.1). Although this passage appeared to provide easy historical evidence for the dekadrachm issue, not every scholar was convinced. It was Ernest Beulé who first raised the chronological question of the issue, and from whom all subsequent research stemmed. Taken in context, the passage in Herodotos would place such an issue shortly after the victory at Marathon in 490 BC, a date that was accepted for the dekadrachm issue by prominent early numismatists, Babelon (Traité II, col. 769-770) and Head (HN, pp. 370-371), but which subsequent scholarship has shown to be far too early. Although Gardner retained the 490 BC date of issue in keeping with Babelon (A History of Ancient Coinage, 700-300 BC, p. 162), he added to the discussion by recognizing that the Athenian dekadrachms were contemporary with those of Syracuse, which he identified with the Demareteia mentioned in the ancient sources and dated to the immediate period following the battle of Himera in 480 BC. Seltman, in his major work on the pre-Persian coinage of Athens, rejected Babelon’s conclusions. Yet, he also failed to put credence in the views of Gardner and subsequently placed the issue far too early, in the later 480s BC. Almost immediately, this view came under fire. Robinson saw Salamis as the occasion for issue (NC [1924], pp. 338-340), and Regling, in his revised edition of Sallet’s Die antiken Münzen, viewed the combined victories of Salamis and Plataiai as the occasion. It was Kraay (NC [1956], p. 55; ACGC, pp. 66-68) who, paying attention to the evidence of the hoards, noted that Seltman’s chronology was far too early; yet, he failed to convince his critics. Starr, whose own study of Athenian coinage also relied on the evidence of the hoards, confirmed some of what Kraay had argued, and suggested that the occasion for the issue of the dekadrachms was the battle near the river Eurymedon (circa 469/5 BC). The subsequent discovery of the Asyut Hoard (IGCH 1644) in 1968/9 and the Elmal? Hoard (CH VIII, 48) in 1984, confirmed a mid-460s BC date.

Various interpretations of the dekadrachms’ purpose have also been proposed. Although Fischer-Bossert suggests that the size of the issue indicates an economic, rather that ceremonial purpose, Head, much of whose work had formed the basis of dekadrachm scholarship, thought they were special, ceremonial issues struck at various times for "the personal gratification of Tyrants or Kings", and were not part of the actual currency. As seen above, Starr's survey of the Athenian coinage, and his confirmation of Kraay’s earlier conclusions, rejected this earlier conception. It seems clear that such an exceptional and compact issue must have served some special function. Recent scholars have focused on two key historical events during this period that could have produced sizable quantities of silver for this series: the battle of the Eurymedon River in 467 BC, where the resulting captured Persian booty was enormous and was attested to have been distributed (Plutarch, Vit. Cim. 13.6-8), and the capture of Thasos and its mines in 463/2 BC, where the plunder is assumed to have been substantial (Plutarch, op. cit. 14.2).

The dekadrachms stand apart from the typical Athenian coinage not only by their massive size, but the transformation of the reverse type from an owl in profile to one facing the viewer. One cannot fail to notice the power in such a portrayal, which clearly is a representation of the growing Athenian military might that produced the victory over the Persians at the Eurymedon River and the later capture of the bountiful Thasian mines.

Auctioneer:

Classical Numismatic Group, LLC
ATTICA, Athens. Circa 469/5-460 BC. AR Dekadrachm (31.5mm, 43.38 g, 3h). Head of Athena right, with frontal eye, wearing single-pendant earring, necklace with pendants, and crested Attic helmet decorated with three olive leaves over the visor and a spiral palmette on the bowl / Owl standing facing, wings spread; olive sprig and crescent to upper left, A-?-E clockwise around from upper right; all within incuse square. Fischer-Bossert, Athenian 24a (O14/R23’) = Stannard & Fischer-Bossert pp. 8–18 (this coin); Starr Group II.C (unlisted dies); Seltman 445–52; HGC 4, 1585; SNG Berry 641; BMC 40 = ACGC 188; Gulbenkian 515 = Jameson 2080; Hirsch 1272; Kraay & Hirmer 357–8; Zhuyuetang 31 (same obv. die). EF, attractive deep gray tone. with iridescence around the devices. Superb metal quality for issue, and perfectly centered strike.


From the Spina Collection. Ex North American Collection of Numismatic Masterpieces (Triton X, 9 January 2007), lot 230.

The present coin represents a splendid example of this magnificent ancient work of art, with a surface quality far exceeding that of the specimens offered over the past several years. It exhibits clear flow lines, very sharp detail junctures, and a crispness often lacking in such large module ancient coins. Additionally, the aesthetic quality of the reverse is exceptional, an extremely powerful design with a well defined and expressive owl in full glory.

The historical context of the Athenian dekadrachms, as well as concomitant tetradrachms and didrachms of the same class, has been the matter of extended debate. Much of the early confusion stems from a passage in Herodotos, who said that Athens paid ten drachms to each of its citizens for surpluses from the Laurion mines (7.144.1). Although this passage appeared to provide easy historical evidence for the dekadrachm issue, not every scholar was convinced. It was Ernest Beulé who first raised the chronological question of the issue, and from whom all subsequent research stemmed. Taken in context, the passage in Herodotos would place such an issue shortly after the victory at Marathon in 490 BC, a date that was accepted for the dekadrachm issue by prominent early numismatists, Babelon (Traité II, col. 769-770) and Head (HN, pp. 370-371), but which subsequent scholarship has shown to be far too early. Although Gardner retained the 490 BC date of issue in keeping with Babelon (A History of Ancient Coinage, 700-300 BC, p. 162), he added to the discussion by recognizing that the Athenian dekadrachms were contemporary with those of Syracuse, which he identified with the Demareteia mentioned in the ancient sources and dated to the immediate period following the battle of Himera in 480 BC. Seltman, in his major work on the pre-Persian coinage of Athens, rejected Babelon’s conclusions. Yet, he also failed to put credence in the views of Gardner and subsequently placed the issue far too early, in the later 480s BC. Almost immediately, this view came under fire. Robinson saw Salamis as the occasion for issue (NC [1924], pp. 338-340), and Regling, in his revised edition of Sallet’s Die antiken Münzen, viewed the combined victories of Salamis and Plataiai as the occasion. It was Kraay (NC [1956], p. 55; ACGC, pp. 66-68) who, paying attention to the evidence of the hoards, noted that Seltman’s chronology was far too early; yet, he failed to convince his critics. Starr, whose own study of Athenian coinage also relied on the evidence of the hoards, confirmed some of what Kraay had argued, and suggested that the occasion for the issue of the dekadrachms was the battle near the river Eurymedon (circa 469/5 BC). The subsequent discovery of the Asyut Hoard (IGCH 1644) in 1968/9 and the Elmal? Hoard (CH VIII, 48) in 1984, confirmed a mid-460s BC date.

Various interpretations of the dekadrachms’ purpose have also been proposed. Although Fischer-Bossert suggests that the size of the issue indicates an economic, rather that ceremonial purpose, Head, much of whose work had formed the basis of dekadrachm scholarship, thought they were special, ceremonial issues struck at various times for "the personal gratification of Tyrants or Kings", and were not part of the actual currency. As seen above, Starr's survey of the Athenian coinage, and his confirmation of Kraay’s earlier conclusions, rejected this earlier conception. It seems clear that such an exceptional and compact issue must have served some special function. Recent scholars have focused on two key historical events during this period that could have produced sizable quantities of silver for this series: the battle of the Eurymedon River in 467 BC, where the resulting captured Persian booty was enormous and was attested to have been distributed (Plutarch, Vit. Cim. 13.6-8), and the capture of Thasos and its mines in 463/2 BC, where the plunder is assumed to have been substantial (Plutarch, op. cit. 14.2).

The dekadrachms stand apart from the typical Athenian coinage not only by their massive size, but the transformation of the reverse type from an owl in profile to one facing the viewer. One cannot fail to notice the power in such a portrayal, which clearly is a representation of the growing Athenian military might that produced the victory over the Persians at the Eurymedon River and the later capture of the bountiful Thasian mines.

Classical Numismatic Group Triton XXII Auction

Sale Date(s)
Lots: 1-379
Lots: 380-777
Lots: 778-1151
Lots: 1171-1456
Venue Address
Grand Hyatt Hotel
109 East 42nd Street
Empire State Ballroom I
Ballroom Level (5th Floor)
New York
New York
10017
United States

For Classical Numismatic Group, LLC delivery information please telephone +1 7173909194.

Important Information

Session 1: lots 1-379 – 8 January 2019 9:30 AM

Session 2: lots 380-777 – 8 January 2019 2:00 PM

Session 3: lots 778-1151 – 9 January 2019 9:30 AM

Session 4: lots 1171-1456 – 9 January 2019 2:00 PM

Terms & Conditions

This is a public, mail bid, and Internet auction conducted by Classical Numismatic Group, LLC (CNG). Bidding in the auction constitutes acceptance of the following terms:

1. The property listed in this catalogue is offered for sale by CNG for itself and as agent for various owners and other consignors. We reserve the right to reject any bid, to determine the opening price, to set bidding increments, to vary the order of the auction, to reopen bidding in the case of a dispute, to withdraw any lot, to bid on behalf of CNG, to bid on behalf of the consignor, to permit the auctioneer to bid on his own behalf, and to permit the consignor to bid on his own lots. CNG may loan or advance money to consignors or prospective bidders, and may have an interest other than commission charges in any lot. CNG may bid on its own account as an “insider” with information not available to the public.

2. A buyer’s fee will be charged to all successful bidders as follows on the hammer price:
A. 22.5% for written, fax, email, telephone, and live internet bids.
B. 20% for floor bids placed in person at the auction and electronic bids placed directly on www.cngcoins.com. All written bids, email bids, non-live telephone bids, live internet bid registrations, and live telephone bid registrations must be received before 5PM Eastern time on the day before the auction begins. CNG reserves the right to change the format of www.cngcoins.com at any time.

3. All coins are guaranteed genuine. Attribution, date, condition, and other descriptions are the opinion of the cataloguer, and no warranty is expressed or implied. Please note that an auction sale is not an approval sale. Lots examined prior to the sale and lots purchased by floor bidders (including bidders executing commission bids on behalf of other parties) may not be returned for any reason except lack of authenticity. All claims of misdescription and all claims of return, except claims regarding authenticity, must be made within 5 days of receipt of material. Any claim of lack of authenticity must be made in writing by the original purchaser immediately after discovery that an item is not authentic, and upon making such a claim the original purchaser must immediately return the lot to CNG in the same condition as at the time of the auction. Coins that have been encapsulated (“slabbed”) by a grading and/or authentication service may not be returned for any reason, including authenticity, if they have been removed from the encapsulation (“slab”). If payment is made by credit card, rights of return are governed by these Auction Terms which supersede any rights of return promulgated by the card issuer. Estimates are intended as a guide only and not as a statement of opinion of value.

4. Invoices are due and payable immediately upon receipt. Interest and late fees of 2.0% per month, or at the highest rate permitted by law, whichever is less, from the date of the auction, shall be payable on invoices not settled within 30 days of the auction date. Payment may be made by check or bank wire. Credit cards (Visa or MasterCard) will be accepted; credit card payments will not be accepted more than 14 days after the sale date. Payment by credit card for printed sale auctions will be charged a 2.5% handling fee. Payment by check must be made in either US dollars ($) drawn on a US bank or British sterling (£) drawn on a British bank. All successful bidders outside North America and the United Kingdom will be charged an additional $20 fee for bank charges that are the result of international wire transfer fees; this fee will be deducted for credit card or check payment as described above. CNG may reduce or compromise any charge or fee at its discretion.

5. Bidders not known to us must provide us with satisfactory credit references or pay a deposit as determined at CNG’s discretion before bidding. Minors are not permitted to bid without written consent of a parent guaranteeing payment. CNG may require payment in full from any bidder prior to delivery of lots. Title does not pass until lots are paid in full. Upon receipt of lots, the buyer assumes full responsibility for loss or damage. Delivery to the buyer’s address of record shall constitute receipt by the buyer regardless of the identity of the person accepting delivery.

6. Estimates are in U.S. dollars ($US) and bids must be in even dollar ($) amounts. CNG will execute mail bids on behalf of mail bidders. Subject to reserves and opening prices, mail bids will be executed at one bidding increment (approximately 10%) over the next highest bid. In the case of identical bids, the earliest bid wins. A mail bid has priority over an identical floor bid. Bid by lot number. No lots will be broken. Bidders are responsible for errors in bidding. Check your bid sheet carefully.

7. All lots are subject to reserve unless otherwise indicated. However, no reserve will be higher than the estimate, and ordinarily lots are reserved at 60% of estimate.

8. Bidders personally guarantee payment for their successful bids, including bidders executing commission bids from other parties and bidders representing corporations or other entities. Buyers accepting commission bids from other parties do so at their own risk and remain responsible for payment under these Auction Terms.

9. At the conclusion of bidding for each lot, the sale contract is concluded and the successful bidder becomes liable for immediate payment under these Auction Terms. In the event a successful bidder fails to make full payment within 30 days of the auction date, CNG reserves the right either: (a) to require payment as provided under these Auction Terms; or (b) to deem the sale incomplete and to re-auction the material, in which case the successful bidder agrees to pay for the reasonable cost of such a sale and also to pay any shortfall between the re-auction price and the successful bidder’s purchase price. CNG reserves all rights that it is entitled to under the Pennsylvania Uniform Commercial Code, including the right to offset any sums due from a successful bidder against any future consignment or purchase or monies or goods in possession of CNG.

10. Sales tax, postage, handling and insurance are the responsibility of the buyer and are added to all invoices where appropriate. For buyers in the European Union, CNG may import lots into the United Kingdom prior to shipment and charge buyers the import Value Added Tax. On any tax not paid by the purchaser which should have been paid, even if not invoiced by CNG, the purchaser agrees to pay the same on demand together with any interest or penalty that may be assessed. It is the responsibility of the buyer to comply with foreign customs and other regulations.

11. Prices realized are published after the sale and are mailed with CNG’s next publication. Prices realized are also posted after the sale on CNG’s web site: www.cngcoins.com

12. Bidders hereby waive any claim for incidental, consequential or exemplary damages arising from this auction. The sole remedy that any participant in the auction shall have for any claim or controversy arising out of the auction shall be a refund, without interest, of all or part of the purchase price paid by the participant.

13. All rights granted by CNG or otherwise available to bidders and purchasers, under these Auction Terms or otherwise, are personal and may not be assigned or transferred to any other person or entity, whether by operation of law or otherwise. No third party may rely on any benefit or right conferred by these Auction Terms. Bidders acting as agents must disclose the agency in writing to CNG prior to the auction; otherwise rights are limited to the agent and are not transferable to the undisclosed principal.

14. Any dispute regarding this auction shall be governed by the laws of Pennsylvania and shall be adjudicated only by the Lancaster County Court of Common Pleas or the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania; all bidders submit themselves to the personal jurisdiction of these courts for this purpose, consent to service of process by registered or certified mail, and waive any contrary provisions of Articles 14 or 15 of the French Civil Code and any similar provisions in any jurisdiction. All bidders consent to the confidentiality of consignors’ identities and waive any right to require disclosure of the name of the consignor or owner of any auction lot, whether such right is based on New York GOL §5-701(a) or any other provision in any jurisdiction. In any dispute regarding this auction, the prevailing party shall be entitled to recover its reasonable costs and attorney fees.

See Full Terms And Conditions