Lot

30

Edward VI, fine silver coinage, crown, mm. y, 1551, crowned figure of king on horseback r.,

In St James Auction 30

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London

Edward VI, fine silver coinage, crown, mm. y, 1551, crowned figure of king on horseback r., shouldering sword, date below, rev. long cross fourchée over shield of arms (S.2478; N.1933), toned, practically extremely fine, very rare this choice *ex Lingford, 1950, lot 3 ex Nightingale 1951 ex Whetmore 1961 ex F. R. Cooper, sold privately A superb piece with an impressive pedigree, this beautiful crown, struck nearly at the end of the tragic short reign of Henry VIII`s only son, was the first of its kind, a 5-shilling piece in good silver, the forerunner of centuries of continuous issuance of this denomination. By the 19th century, silver crowns did not circulate broadly or for long, having been replaced as money by paper currency or cheques in most commerce; but such was not the case in the middle of the 16th century, when `hard money` was the only kind of money and also when the political message of a king on horseback, the titular head of a powerful nation with a long history of military achievements, carried real meaning both at home and abroad in foreign trade. But the story behind this coin involves the boy-king`s father, Henry Tudor, whose flagrant disregard for fiscal prudence at last led to a poor treasury and a lack of faith in his money generally. But ridding the commercial lanes of debased coin was not easily managed, and it was only in this latter period of the reign of Edward VI that silver of fine quality was in sufficient supply to drive out the bad coins. Gold, too, was returned to good quality but it was not the stuff of commerce across the land. Silver was. J.J. North tells us that, in fact, the `greatest improvement was in the silver coins, most of which were struck from metal of 11 oz. 1 dwt. fine`, and most noticed by the public were the large crown and halfcrown, both sharing the same designs, and then the shilling showing a fine three-quarters facing image of the crowned young king. A testament to the acceptance and thus success of this coinage is the paucity of examples found today in quality condition; most of the issued coinage was used and heavily worn. Somehow, this exceptionally fine example of the `horseman crown` survived, possibly kept by a wealthy admirer of the Tudors and their last male heir to the throne of England.

Auctioneer:

St. James's Auctions (Knightsbridge Coins)

Edward VI, fine silver coinage, crown, mm. y, 1551, crowned figure of king on horseback r., shouldering sword, date below, rev. long cross fourchée over shield of arms (S.2478; N.1933), toned, practically extremely fine, very rare this choice *ex Lingford, 1950, lot 3 ex Nightingale 1951 ex Whetmore 1961 ex F. R. Cooper, sold privately A superb piece with an impressive pedigree, this beautiful crown, struck nearly at the end of the tragic short reign of Henry VIII`s only son, was the first of its kind, a 5-shilling piece in good silver, the forerunner of centuries of continuous issuance of this denomination. By the 19th century, silver crowns did not circulate broadly or for long, having been replaced as money by paper currency or cheques in most commerce; but such was not the case in the middle of the 16th century, when `hard money` was the only kind of money and also when the political message of a king on horseback, the titular head of a powerful nation with a long history of military achievements, carried real meaning both at home and abroad in foreign trade. But the story behind this coin involves the boy-king`s father, Henry Tudor, whose flagrant disregard for fiscal prudence at last led to a poor treasury and a lack of faith in his money generally. But ridding the commercial lanes of debased coin was not easily managed, and it was only in this latter period of the reign of Edward VI that silver of fine quality was in sufficient supply to drive out the bad coins. Gold, too, was returned to good quality but it was not the stuff of commerce across the land. Silver was. J.J. North tells us that, in fact, the `greatest improvement was in the silver coins, most of which were struck from metal of 11 oz. 1 dwt. fine`, and most noticed by the public were the large crown and halfcrown, both sharing the same designs, and then the shilling showing a fine three-quarters facing image of the crowned young king. A testament to the acceptance and thus success of this coinage is the paucity of examples found today in quality condition; most of the issued coinage was used and heavily worn. Somehow, this exceptionally fine example of the `horseman crown` survived, possibly kept by a wealthy admirer of the Tudors and their last male heir to the throne of England.

St James Auction 30

Sale Date(s)
Venue Address
43 Duke Street
London
SW1Y 6DD
United Kingdom

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Important Information


Edward VI, fine silver coinage crown, 1551
three Elizabeth I fine sovereigns
Charles II halfcrown, 1666/4
William III crown, 1697
George III ‘Three Graces’ pattern crown
George IV proof two pounds, 1826
a set of George IV pattern coins in Barton’s metal, 1825, in original case
Victoria ‘Una and the Lion’ proof five pounds
a cased collection of Victorian Maundy sets, 1838-1901
a set of Smith’s decimal patterns by Marrian & Gausby, 1846
Victoria, pattern crown, 1887
Scotland, James VI, double crown
Iraq, double presentation proof set, 1931, in original case



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The symbol "G" appearing next to a lot in this catalogue denotes the item is "Investment Gold" and, therefore, a VAT-registered trader can submit a claim to H M Revenue and Customs to recover the VAT element of the Buyers Premium

Terms & Conditions


CONDITIONS OF SALE


(1) St. James’s Auctions [the Company] is a division of Knightsbridge Coins. These sales at public auction are undertaken as agent only, acting on behalf of the seller. The contract of sale for any lot will be between the seller and the buyer.

(2) The buyer of any lot will be the highest bidder. In the event of any dispute, the auctioneer shall have absolute discretion to settle the dispute as he thinks best; this may mean re-offering the lot for sale.

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(6) All lots are subject to a Buyer’s Premium of 24.00%, inclusive of VAT, (20% + VAT), payable by all buyers.
In the case of a lot marked with a dagger (†), import VAT at 5% will be added to the hammer price and will be payable by the buyer if resident in the EU. If the lot is being exported outside the EU, this import VAT can be waived or refunded on proof of export.

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(10) All lots, however, are held to be at the buyer’s risk from the fall of the hammer. All lots shall be removed by the buyer within seven working days after the date of the sale. Any lots not so removed may become liable to removal, insurance and storage charges. Such lots may, at the auctioneer’s discretion, be re-offered for sale at auction or by private treaty without further notice to the buyer.

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(b) Notwithstanding the foregoing, if any lot, other than a miscellaneous item not individually described in the catalogue, should be proved by the buyer to be not genuine or authentic, or to have been wrongly described in any material respect, the buyer may reject the same provided that he shall have given notice of his intention so to do and shall have returned the same to St James’s Auctions within one month from, and in the same condition as at, the date of sale. The onus of proving a lot to be not genuine or authentic or to have been so wrongly described shall lie with the buyer. Proof of the inability of any recognised expert or authority to express a definite opinion shall not discharge such onus. If the buyer shall discharge such onus, the auctioneers shall rescind the sale and repay to the buyer the price paid by him. Save as provided herein, St James’s Auctions shall not under any circumstances whatsoever be liable for any costs, expenses or damages (whether direct, indirect, special or consequential) incurred by the buyer in respect of any lot, whether or not as a result of any fault, imperfection, error or description or lack of genuineness or authenticity, including but not limited to loss of any kind of profit whatsoever.

(13) Save as provided in the preceding paragraph of these conditions buyers must satisfy themselves as to the accuracy of their purchases at the time of delivery. St James’s Auctions cannot be held responsible for any discrepancy which might be discovered after the lots have been removed from either the auction room or the auctioneers' premises.

(14) As stated in paragraph (1), the Company acts solely as agent between buyer and seller and shall not be held responsible for any default by either party or for any action or claim that may arise in connection with any lot.

(15) Any part of the purchase price still outstanding after the auction, in line with the terms of paragraph (8), shall be paid in full within thirty days of the date of the auction. Without prejudice to any other rights, the Company reserves the right to charge interest on any overdue payment at a rate of three per cent per month. In the event that the company shall have paid the vendor (normally 35 days after the sale) and part of the purchase price is still outstanding, title to the lot will pass to the Company. The Company shall then have the right to sell any other goods belonging to the buyer and held by the Company for whatever reason at such a price that the company, in its absolute discretion, thinks fit. The buyer shall also reimburse the Company for any additional costs incurred in this process.

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(18) If any buyer fails to comply with any of these Conditions, the lot or lots in respect of which the failure is made may at the discretion of St James’s Auctions be put up again and resold. The damages recoverable from the defaulting buyer shall include, but not be limited to, the auctioneers' expenses and commission in respect of the resale and the amount (if any) by which the price obtained on the resale is exceeded by that obtained on the first sale.

(19) A variation of these Conditions shall only be binding on St James’s Auctions and the vendor if it is made in writing and signed by a duly authorised representative of St James’s Auctions.

(20) These Conditions shall take effect and be construed in accordance with the provisions of English law.


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