Lot

18

Antonio Campi: Portrait of a clock collector

In Big Christmas Auction

This auction is live! You need to be registered and approved to bid at this auction.
You have been outbid. For the best chance of winning, increase your maximum bid.
Your bid or registration is pending approval with the auctioneer. Please check your email account for more details.
Unfortunately, your registration has been declined by the auctioneer. You can contact the auctioneer on +43 1 5324200 for more information.
You are the current highest bidder! To be sure to win, log in for the live auction broadcast on or increase your max bid.
Leave a bid now! Your registration has been successful.
Sorry, bidding has ended on this item. We have thousands of new lots everyday, start a new search.
Bidding on this auction has not started. Please register now so you are approved to bid when auction starts.
Bidding has ended
Antonio Campi: Portrait of a clock collector
Interested in the price of this lot?
Subscribe to the price guide
Vienna
Antonio Campi
Portrait of a clock collector
c. 1550
oil on canvas
110.5 x 77 cm
collection Wilhelm Ofenheim (1860-1932), Vienna;
private collection, Vienna
Stephan Poglayen-Neuwall, The Wilhelm Ofenheim Collection, in: Apollo. A Journal of the Arts, August 1930, p. 128, b/w-ill. IV (as "by an imitator of G.W. Moroni")
The outstanding portrait was previously known to researchers only through a black-and-white illustration published in 1930. Marco Tanzi was now able to identify it as the work of Antonio Campi and described it as an authentic masterpiece and an important contribution to Cremonese portraiture in the 16th century.
Antonio Campi came from one of the most important artistic families in Cremona. He was the son of Galeazzo Campi (c. 1475-1536) and the brother of Giulio (1502-1572) and Vincenzo (1536-1591) Campi, with whom he had a significant influence on Cremonese painting. In addition to religious works, such as the altarpiece of the "Holy Family with St. Jerome and a Donor (Guibaldo Possevino)", dated 1546, Antonio Campi's activity as a sought-after portraitist is already documented in contemporary sources. In 1584, for example, Alessandro Lamo reports on a portrait by Campi depicting "Danese Filiodoni", the mayor of Cremona, senator and grand chancellor of the state of Milan. Also, in the book "Cremona fedelissima città et nobilissima colonia de romani..." published by Antonio Campi in 1585 and dedicated to his hometown, portraits of the leading figures are presented alongside views.

Based on the modelling of the facial features and the painterly realisation, this painting is particularly close to Campi's "Portrait of a Prelate" in the Gallerie Spada, Rome, and "Portrait of an Elderly Nobleman" in private ownership. These characteristic affinities are also visible in the "Portrait of a Young Man from the Piperari Family", although the one sitter looks dreamily into the void and the watch collector deliberately faces the painter and viewer 'as if looking into a camera'. An equally haunting gaze is found in the 'Portrait of an Elderly Man with Letter and Gloves', now in the Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland. (cf. M. Tanzi, Antonio Campi: il Ritratto di prelato n. 182 della Galleria Spada, in: Studi di Storia dell'arte in onore di Fabrizio Lemme, ed. by F. Baldassari, A. Agresti, Rome 2017, pp. 81-88, figs. 1,2,3 & 5).

Marco Tanzi dates the painting around the mid-16th century. However, he points out that it appears even more powerful and at the same time more sensitive than the works mentioned above, with a direct approach and no concessions to the idealisation of the sitter; truly executed according to nature, yet skilfully flattering ("Il Ritratto di collezionista di orologi di Antonio Campi è un dipinto allo stesso tempo più gagliardo e sensibile rispetto alle opere appena menzionate, con un approccio diretto e senza concessioni all'idealizzazione all'effigiato e contrassegnato sì dal vero di natura, ma come ancora attento alle lusinghe sofisticate della maniera. "). It shows the typical influences that shaped Cremonese painting: on the one hand, the exchange with artists from Bergamo, such as Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1557) and Giovanni Battista Moroni (c. 1520-1579); on the other hand, the openness to Flemish painting, so much so that the great art historian Roberto Longhi also referred to Cremona in the past as the "little Antwerp" of Lombardy in the 16th century.

In the three-quarter portrait, the sitter looks directly at the viewer as he is captured in the intimate moment when he carefully attends to his precious collection items and is about to open the table clock. He is dressed in sumptuous garb - a black beret and fur-lined robe while his silver-grey shirt with white lace at the neck and sleeves emerging from beneath. His gaze and gestures, as well as the skilful play of chromatics, set him apart from the grey and undefined background. The viewer's eye is drawn by the bright green velvet cloth to the proudly presented precious objects in the lower right corner of the picture.

The two rare watches are obviously representative of the respectable collection of a distinguished personality. The first is a spherical pomander clock - an early pocket watch that developed from a pomander. Probably the oldest completely preserved example can be found today in the Walters Art Museum - the so-called Melanchthon clock made in 1530. The second piece is a table clock with a horizontal dial, probably kept in a case for protection. Comparable clocks from the 16th century can be found, for example, in the Metropolitan Museum, New York (Inv. 29.52.4) or in the Louvre, Paris (Inv. OA 675).
Nuremberg is considered to be the major production centre of clocks and other scientific instruments in the early modern period. However, in addition to French production sites, northern Italy, specifically Cremona, was also home to some important clockmakers, astrologers, and manufacturers of scientific instruments. This portrait should therefore be seen not only as a painterly jewel of the art of portraiture, but also as a historical document of the development and appreciation of the clock as a collector's item.
Antonio Campi
Porträt eines Uhrensammlers
um 1550
Öl auf Leinwand
110,5 x 77 cm
Sammlung Wilhelm Ofenheim (1860-1932), Wien;
Privatsammlung, Wien
Stephan Poglayen-Neuwall, The Wilhelm Ofenheim Collection, in: Apollo. A Journal of the Arts, August 1930, S. 128, S/W-Abb. IV (als "by an imitator of G.B. Moroni")
Das herausragende Porträt war bislang der Forschung nur durch eine 1930 publizierte Schwarzweiß-Abbildung bekannt. Marco Tanzi konnte es nun jedoch als Werk Antonio Campis identifizieren und bezeichnete es als ein authentisches Meisterwerk und wichtigen Beitrag zur Cremoneser Porträtkunst im 16. Jahrhundert.
Antonio Campi entstammte einer der bedeutendsten Künstlerfamilien in Cremona. Er war der Sohn von Galeazzo Campi (um 1475-1536) und der Bruder von Giulio (1502-1572) und Vincenzo (1536-1591) Campi, mit denen er gemeinsam die Cremoneser Malerei entscheidend prägte. Neben sakralen Werken, wie das 1546 datierte Altarbild der "Hl. Familie mit hl. Hieronymus und einem Stifter (Guibaldo Possevino)", ist die Tätigkeit Antonio Campis auch als gefragter Porträtist bereits in zeitgenössischen Quellen dokumentiert. So berichtet beispielsweise Alessandro Lamo 1584 von einem Porträt Campis "Danese Filiodoni", den Bürgermeister von Cremona, Senator und Großkanzler des Staates Mailand, darstellend. Auch in dem von Antonio Campi im Jahre 1585 erschienenen und seiner Heimatstadt gewidmeten Buch "Cremona fedelissima città et nobilissima colonia de romani…" sind neben Ansichten auch die Porträts der führenden Persönlichkeiten präsentiert.

Anhand der Modellierung der Gesichtszüge und der malerischen Umsetzung steht vorliegendes Gemälde Campis "Porträt eines Prälaten" in der Gallerie Spada, Rom, und "Porträt eines älteren Edelmannes" in Privatbesitz besonders nahe. Auch im "Bildnis eines jungen Mannes aus der Familie Piperari" sind diese charakteristischen Verwandtschaften sichtbar, obwohl der eine Dargestellte verträumt in die Leere sieht und sich der Uhrensammler ganz bewusst ‚wie in eine Kamera blickend‘ dem Maler und Betrachter gegenüberstellt. Ein ebenso eindringlicher Blick findet sich im "Porträt eines älteren Mannes mit Brief und Handschuhen", heute im Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland. (vgl. M. Tanzi, Antonio Campi: il Ritratto di prelato n. 182 della Galleria Spada, in: Studi di Storia dell’arte in onore di Fabrizio Lemme, Hg. von F. Baldassari, A. Agresti, Rom 2017, S. 81-88, Abb. 1,2,3 & 5).

Marco Tanzi datiert das Gemälde um die Mitte des 16. Jahrhunderts, verweist jedoch darauf, dass es noch kraftvoller und zugleich sensibler erscheint als die oben genannten Werke mit direkter Annäherung und ohne Zugeständnisse an die Idealisierung des Dargestellten; wahrhaftig nach der Natur, aber trotzdem gekonnt schmeichelnd ausgeführt ("Il Ritratto di collezionista di orologi di Antonio Campi è un dipinto allo stesso tempo più gagliardo e sensibile rispetto alle opere appena menzionate, con un approccio diretto e senza concessioni all’idealizzazione all’effigiato e contrassegnato sì dal vero di natura, ma come ancora attento alle lusinghe sofisticate della maniera."). Es zeigt die typischen Einflüsse, die die Cremoneser Malerei prägten: Zum einen der Austausch mit Künstlern aus Bergamo, wie beispielsweise Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1557) und Giovanni Battista Moroni (um 1520-1579); andererseits aber auch die Offenheit für die Flämische Malerei, so dass der große Kunsthistoriker Roberto Longhi in der Vergangenheit Cremona auch als das "kleine Antwerpen" der Lombardei im 16. Jahrhundert bezeichnete.

Im Dreiviertelporträt blickt der Dargestellte den Betrachter direkt an, während er in dem innigen Moment eingefangen wird, in welchem er sich vorsichtig seinen kostbaren Sammlungsstücken widmet und dabei ist die Tischuhr zu öffnen. Er ist in prunkvollem Gewand gekleidet – mit einem schwarzen Barett und einer pelzgefütterten Robe während darunter sein silbergraues Hemd mit weißen Spitzen an Hals und Ärmeln hervortritt. Durch Blick und Gesten sowie das gekonnte Spiel mit der Chromatik hebt er sich vom grauen und nicht näher definierten Hintergrund ab. Das Auge des Betrachters wird durch das leuchtend grüne Samttuch auf die stolz präsentierten Preziosen in der rechten unteren Bildecke gelenkt.

Die zwei seltenen Uhren stehen offensichtlich stellvertretend für die respektable Sammlung einer hochstehenden Persönlichkeit. Zum Einen handelt es sich dabei um eine kugelförmige Bisamapfeluhr – eine frühe, sich aus einem Riechapfel entwickelte Taschenuhr. Das wohl älteste vollständig erhaltene Expemplar findet sich heute im Walters-Art-Museum - die sogenannte 1530 gefertigte Melanchton-Uhr. Beim zweiten Stück handelt es sich um eine Tischuhr mit horizontalem Ziffernblatt, die wohl zum Schutz in einem Gehäuse verwahrt wird. Vergleichbare Uhren aus dem 16. Jahrhundert befinden sich beispielsweise im Metropolitan Museum, New York (Inv. 29.52.4) oder im Louvre, Paris (Inv. OA 675).
Als das große Produktionszentrum von Uhren und anderen wissenschaftlichen Instrumenten in der frühen Neuzeit gilt Nürnberg. Neben französischen Produktionsstätten war jedoch auch Norditalien, konkret eben Cremona, die Heimat einiger bedeutender Uhrmacher, Astrologen und Hersteller wissenschaftlicher Instrumente. Das vorliegende Porträt ist also nicht nur als malerisches Juwel der Porträtkunst zu sehen, sondern zugleich als historisches Dokument für die Entwicklung und Wertschätzung der Uhr als Sammlungsobjekt.
Antonio Campi
Portrait of a clock collector
c. 1550
oil on canvas
110.5 x 77 cm
collection Wilhelm Ofenheim (1860-1932), Vienna;
private collection, Vienna
Stephan Poglayen-Neuwall, The Wilhelm Ofenheim Collection, in: Apollo. A Journal of the Arts, August 1930, p. 128, b/w-ill. IV (as "by an imitator of G.W. Moroni")
The outstanding portrait was previously known to researchers only through a black-and-white illustration published in 1930. Marco Tanzi was now able to identify it as the work of Antonio Campi and described it as an authentic masterpiece and an important contribution to Cremonese portraiture in the 16th century.
Antonio Campi came from one of the most important artistic families in Cremona. He was the son of Galeazzo Campi (c. 1475-1536) and the brother of Giulio (1502-1572) and Vincenzo (1536-1591) Campi, with whom he had a significant influence on Cremonese painting. In addition to religious works, such as the altarpiece of the "Holy Family with St. Jerome and a Donor (Guibaldo Possevino)", dated 1546, Antonio Campi's activity as a sought-after portraitist is already documented in contemporary sources. In 1584, for example, Alessandro Lamo reports on a portrait by Campi depicting "Danese Filiodoni", the mayor of Cremona, senator and grand chancellor of the state of Milan. Also, in the book "Cremona fedelissima città et nobilissima colonia de romani..." published by Antonio Campi in 1585 and dedicated to his hometown, portraits of the leading figures are presented alongside views.

Based on the modelling of the facial features and the painterly realisation, this painting is particularly close to Campi's "Portrait of a Prelate" in the Gallerie Spada, Rome, and "Portrait of an Elderly Nobleman" in private ownership. These characteristic affinities are also visible in the "Portrait of a Young Man from the Piperari Family", although the one sitter looks dreamily into the void and the watch collector deliberately faces the painter and viewer 'as if looking into a camera'. An equally haunting gaze is found in the 'Portrait of an Elderly Man with Letter and Gloves', now in the Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland. (cf. M. Tanzi, Antonio Campi: il Ritratto di prelato n. 182 della Galleria Spada, in: Studi di Storia dell'arte in onore di Fabrizio Lemme, ed. by F. Baldassari, A. Agresti, Rome 2017, pp. 81-88, figs. 1,2,3 & 5).

Marco Tanzi dates the painting around the mid-16th century. However, he points out that it appears even more powerful and at the same time more sensitive than the works mentioned above, with a direct approach and no concessions to the idealisation of the sitter; truly executed according to nature, yet skilfully flattering ("Il Ritratto di collezionista di orologi di Antonio Campi è un dipinto allo stesso tempo più gagliardo e sensibile rispetto alle opere appena menzionate, con un approccio diretto e senza concessioni all'idealizzazione all'effigiato e contrassegnato sì dal vero di natura, ma come ancora attento alle lusinghe sofisticate della maniera. "). It shows the typical influences that shaped Cremonese painting: on the one hand, the exchange with artists from Bergamo, such as Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1557) and Giovanni Battista Moroni (c. 1520-1579); on the other hand, the openness to Flemish painting, so much so that the great art historian Roberto Longhi also referred to Cremona in the past as the "little Antwerp" of Lombardy in the 16th century.

In the three-quarter portrait, the sitter looks directly at the viewer as he is captured in the intimate moment when he carefully attends to his precious collection items and is about to open the table clock. He is dressed in sumptuous garb - a black beret and fur-lined robe while his silver-grey shirt with white lace at the neck and sleeves emerging from beneath. His gaze and gestures, as well as the skilful play of chromatics, set him apart from the grey and undefined background. The viewer's eye is drawn by the bright green velvet cloth to the proudly presented precious objects in the lower right corner of the picture.

The two rare watches are obviously representative of the respectable collection of a distinguished personality. The first is a spherical pomander clock - an early pocket watch that developed from a pomander. Probably the oldest completely preserved example can be found today in the Walters Art Museum - the so-called Melanchthon clock made in 1530. The second piece is a table clock with a horizontal dial, probably kept in a case for protection. Comparable clocks from the 16th century can be found, for example, in the Metropolitan Museum, New York (Inv. 29.52.4) or in the Louvre, Paris (Inv. OA 675).
Nuremberg is considered to be the major production centre of clocks and other scientific instruments in the early modern period. However, in addition to French production sites, northern Italy, specifically Cremona, was also home to some important clockmakers, astrologers, and manufacturers of scientific instruments. This portrait should therefore be seen not only as a painterly jewel of the art of portraiture, but also as a historical document of the development and appreciation of the clock as a collector's item.
Antonio Campi
Porträt eines Uhrensammlers
um 1550
Öl auf Leinwand
110,5 x 77 cm
Sammlung Wilhelm Ofenheim (1860-1932), Wien;
Privatsammlung, Wien
Stephan Poglayen-Neuwall, The Wilhelm Ofenheim Collection, in: Apollo. A Journal of the Arts, August 1930, S. 128, S/W-Abb. IV (als "by an imitator of G.B. Moroni")
Das herausragende Porträt war bislang der Forschung nur durch eine 1930 publizierte Schwarzweiß-Abbildung bekannt. Marco Tanzi konnte es nun jedoch als Werk Antonio Campis identifizieren und bezeichnete es als ein authentisches Meisterwerk und wichtigen Beitrag zur Cremoneser Porträtkunst im 16. Jahrhundert.
Antonio Campi entstammte einer der bedeutendsten Künstlerfamilien in Cremona. Er war der Sohn von Galeazzo Campi (um 1475-1536) und der Bruder von Giulio (1502-1572) und Vincenzo (1536-1591) Campi, mit denen er gemeinsam die Cremoneser Malerei entscheidend prägte. Neben sakralen Werken, wie das 1546 datierte Altarbild der "Hl. Familie mit hl. Hieronymus und einem Stifter (Guibaldo Possevino)", ist die Tätigkeit Antonio Campis auch als gefragter Porträtist bereits in zeitgenössischen Quellen dokumentiert. So berichtet beispielsweise Alessandro Lamo 1584 von einem Porträt Campis "Danese Filiodoni", den Bürgermeister von Cremona, Senator und Großkanzler des Staates Mailand, darstellend. Auch in dem von Antonio Campi im Jahre 1585 erschienenen und seiner Heimatstadt gewidmeten Buch "Cremona fedelissima città et nobilissima colonia de romani…" sind neben Ansichten auch die Porträts der führenden Persönlichkeiten präsentiert.

Anhand der Modellierung der Gesichtszüge und der malerischen Umsetzung steht vorliegendes Gemälde Campis "Porträt eines Prälaten" in der Gallerie Spada, Rom, und "Porträt eines älteren Edelmannes" in Privatbesitz besonders nahe. Auch im "Bildnis eines jungen Mannes aus der Familie Piperari" sind diese charakteristischen Verwandtschaften sichtbar, obwohl der eine Dargestellte verträumt in die Leere sieht und sich der Uhrensammler ganz bewusst ‚wie in eine Kamera blickend‘ dem Maler und Betrachter gegenüberstellt. Ein ebenso eindringlicher Blick findet sich im "Porträt eines älteren Mannes mit Brief und Handschuhen", heute im Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland. (vgl. M. Tanzi, Antonio Campi: il Ritratto di prelato n. 182 della Galleria Spada, in: Studi di Storia dell’arte in onore di Fabrizio Lemme, Hg. von F. Baldassari, A. Agresti, Rom 2017, S. 81-88, Abb. 1,2,3 & 5).

Marco Tanzi datiert das Gemälde um die Mitte des 16. Jahrhunderts, verweist jedoch darauf, dass es noch kraftvoller und zugleich sensibler erscheint als die oben genannten Werke mit direkter Annäherung und ohne Zugeständnisse an die Idealisierung des Dargestellten; wahrhaftig nach der Natur, aber trotzdem gekonnt schmeichelnd ausgeführt ("Il Ritratto di collezionista di orologi di Antonio Campi è un dipinto allo stesso tempo più gagliardo e sensibile rispetto alle opere appena menzionate, con un approccio diretto e senza concessioni all’idealizzazione all’effigiato e contrassegnato sì dal vero di natura, ma come ancora attento alle lusinghe sofisticate della maniera."). Es zeigt die typischen Einflüsse, die die Cremoneser Malerei prägten: Zum einen der Austausch mit Künstlern aus Bergamo, wie beispielsweise Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1557) und Giovanni Battista Moroni (um 1520-1579); andererseits aber auch die Offenheit für die Flämische Malerei, so dass der große Kunsthistoriker Roberto Longhi in der Vergangenheit Cremona auch als das "kleine Antwerpen" der Lombardei im 16. Jahrhundert bezeichnete.

Im Dreiviertelporträt blickt der Dargestellte den Betrachter direkt an, während er in dem innigen Moment eingefangen wird, in welchem er sich vorsichtig seinen kostbaren Sammlungsstücken widmet und dabei ist die Tischuhr zu öffnen. Er ist in prunkvollem Gewand gekleidet – mit einem schwarzen Barett und einer pelzgefütterten Robe während darunter sein silbergraues Hemd mit weißen Spitzen an Hals und Ärmeln hervortritt. Durch Blick und Gesten sowie das gekonnte Spiel mit der Chromatik hebt er sich vom grauen und nicht näher definierten Hintergrund ab. Das Auge des Betrachters wird durch das leuchtend grüne Samttuch auf die stolz präsentierten Preziosen in der rechten unteren Bildecke gelenkt.

Die zwei seltenen Uhren stehen offensichtlich stellvertretend für die respektable Sammlung einer hochstehenden Persönlichkeit. Zum Einen handelt es sich dabei um eine kugelförmige Bisamapfeluhr – eine frühe, sich aus einem Riechapfel entwickelte Taschenuhr. Das wohl älteste vollständig erhaltene Expemplar findet sich heute im Walters-Art-Museum - die sogenannte 1530 gefertigte Melanchton-Uhr. Beim zweiten Stück handelt es sich um eine Tischuhr mit horizontalem Ziffernblatt, die wohl zum Schutz in einem Gehäuse verwahrt wird. Vergleichbare Uhren aus dem 16. Jahrhundert befinden sich beispielsweise im Metropolitan Museum, New York (Inv. 29.52.4) oder im Louvre, Paris (Inv. OA 675).
Als das große Produktionszentrum von Uhren und anderen wissenschaftlichen Instrumenten in der frühen Neuzeit gilt Nürnberg. Neben französischen Produktionsstätten war jedoch auch Norditalien, konkret eben Cremona, die Heimat einiger bedeutender Uhrmacher, Astrologen und Hersteller wissenschaftlicher Instrumente. Das vorliegende Porträt ist also nicht nur als malerisches Juwel der Porträtkunst zu sehen, sondern zugleich als historisches Dokument für die Entwicklung und Wertschätzung der Uhr als Sammlungsobjekt.

Big Christmas Auction

Sale Date(s)
Lots: 1-169
Lots: 201-378
Lots: 1001-1283
Lots: 1301-1511
Lots: 2001-2163
Lots: 2201-2501

General delivery information available from the auctioneer

If you do not wish to collect your pieces from us yourself, we will arrange delivery for you. Our specialist business partners are professionals in packing, insurance and delivery and will provide these services at advantageous rates. The after-sales service usually proceeds as follows:If you would like, after the auction our logistics department will give you a quotation for transport and insurance.
If you would like to take advantage of this delivery option, contact the logistics department, after you have paid the purchase price, T +43 1 5324200-18 or r.mayr@imkinsky.com
When you place your order, your details will be sent to the appropriate shipping company. You will be contacted by our business partner to arrange a delivery date.
The price for transport and insurance is arranged directly with the shipping company.
If you don’t want to take advantage of this service, we must ask you to arrange collection yourself. We ask for your understanding that in this case we can take no responsibility for the quality of packing or transportation and can therefore take no responsibility for whether your pieces arrive intact.

Important Information

In this auction we offer a selection of high class art works from all our departments: Old Master Paintings, 19th Century Paintings, Antiques, Art Nouveau & Design, Modern Art and Contemporary Art.

 

 

Terms & Conditions

Conditions of Auction

Extract from the rules of procedure

The wording of the complete rules of procedure can be viewed on our homepage www.imkinsky.com. By request we will also send the rules of procedure to you.

• Rules of Business: Auctions are conducted according to the conditions of sale as set down by Auktionshaus im Kinsky GmbH. The rules of business are available for viewing at the Auction House, and can be requested by post or email (office@imkinsky.com), they can also be called up on the internet under www.imkinsky.com. 

• Estimates: In the catalogues the lower and upper estimated values are indicated and represent the approximate bid expectations of the responsible experts. 

• Reserves (Limits): Sellers quite often appoint the auction house, not to sell their objects beneath certain price. These prices (= reserve/limit) usually match the lower estimate, but in special situations can also surpass them.

• Guarantee of Authenticity: The valuation, as well as technical classification and description of the art objects is carried out by the specialists of Auktionshaus im Kinsky. Auktionshaus im Kinsky guarantees the purchaser the authenticity for three years – i.e. that the authorship of the art object is as set out in the catalogue. 

• Catalogue Descriptions: Catalogue information concerning techniques, signatures, materials, condition, provenance, period of origin or manufacture­ etc. are based on the current knowledge determined by the experts. Auktionshaus im Kinsky cannot be held responsible for the verification of these descriptions. 

• Insurance: All the art objects are insured. The insurance value is the purchase price. The responsibility of the Auction House lasts until the eighth day after the auction. After that, each art object is only insured if there is an order from the purchaser to do so. 

• Starting price & Hammer price: The starting price is determined by the auctioneer. The bidding rises in approximate increments of 10 % from the starting price, or from the last bid. The highest bidder acknowledged by the auctioneer will be the purchaser as long as it has reached the minimum price (reserve). 

• Buyer’s Premium: For art objects which require ‘difference’ taxation the purchase price consists of the hammer price plus the sales commission of 28 %.  For art objects which require ‘normal’ taxation (marked with ▲), the price consists of the hammer price plus commission of 24 %, plus VAT (13 % for paintings, 20 % for antiques). For hammer price in excess of € 300,000 we will charge a commission of 20 % (margin taxation) or 17 % (normal taxation).

• Droit de suite: Objects marked with an asterisk* in the catalogue are subject to droit de suite in addition to the purchase price. Droit de suite is calculated as a percentage of the highest bid as follows: 4 % of the first € 50,000, 3 % of the next € 150,000, 1 % of the next € 150,000, 0.5 % of the next € 150,000 and 0.25 % of the remaining amount (i.e. over € 500,000), but not exceeding a total sum of € 12,500. Droit de suite does not apply to ­highest bids below € 2,500. 

• Absentee bids: Clients can also submit written absentee bids or bid themselves over the phone, or give an order to the broker. To do so Auktionshaus im Kinsky must have received signed order forms, (available in the catalogues), in due time. 

• Telephone bids: We will do our best to establish a telephone link, but we cannot warrant for such a telephone connection.

• Online Bidding: Interested parties can participate in the auction also via the Internet. The regulations of Auktionshaus im Kinsky shall be applicable. Auktionshaus im Kinsky assumes no liability for any breakdown or loss of the Internet connection. 

• Governing Law and jurisdiction: The site for the dealings between Auktionshaus im Kinsky and the purchaser is the address of Auktionshaus im Kinsky. All legal dealings or conflicts between persons involved in the auctions are governed by Austrian Law, place of jurisdiction shall be the Courts for the First District of Vienna.

 

 

Auktionsbedingungen

Auszug aus der Geschäftsordnung

Den Wortlaut der gesamten Geschäftsordnung können Sie unserer Homepage www.imkinsky.com entnehmen. Auf Wunsch senden wir Ihnen die Geschäftsordnung auch zu.

•Geschäftsordnung: Die Auktion wird nach den Bestimmungen der Geschäftsordnung der Auktionshaus im Kinsky GmbH durchgeführt. Die Geschäftsordnung liegt im Auktionshaus zur Einsicht auf, kann von jedermann per Post oder E-mail (office@imkinsky.com) angefordert werden und ist im Internet unter www.imkinsky.com abrufbar. 

•Schätzpreise: Im Katalog sind untere und obere Schätzwerte angegeben. Sie stellen die Meistboterwartungen der zuständigen Experten dar. 

•Mindestverkaufspreise (Limits): Oft beauftragen Verkäufer das Auktionshaus, die ihnen gehörenden Kunstwerke nicht unter bestimmten (Mindest-)Verkaufspreisen zuzuschlagen. Diese Preise (= „Limits“) entsprechen meist den in den Katalogen angegebenen unteren Schätzwerten, sie können aber fallweise auch darüber liegen.

•Echtheitsgarantie: Die Schätzung, fachliche Bestimmung und Beschreibung der Kunstobjekte erfolgt durch Experten des Auktionshauses-. Das Auktionshaus steht innerhalb von drei Jahren gegenüber dem Käufer für die Echtheit und somit dafür ein, dass ein Kunstobjekt tatsächlich von dem im Katalog genannten Künstler stammt. 

•Katalogangaben: Angaben über Technik, Signatur, Material, Zustand, Provenienz, Epoche der Entstehung usw. beruhen auf aktuellen wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen, die die Experten ausgeforscht haben. Das Auktionshaus leistet jedoch für die Richtigkeit dieser Angaben gegenüber keine Gewähr. 

•Versicherung: Die Kunstobjekte sind versichert. Versicherungswert ist der Kaufpreis. Die Haftung des Auktionshauses besteht bis zu dem auf die Auktion folgenden 8. Tag. Danach ist ein Kunstobjekt nur versichert, wenn der Käufer dies dem Auktionshaus aufgetragen hat. 

•Ausrufpreis und Zuschlag: Der Ausrufpreis wird vom Auktionator festgesetzt. Gesteigert wird um ca. 10 % des Ausrufpreises bzw. vom letzten Angebot aus-gehend. Den Zuschlag erhält der Meistbietende, sofern der Mindestverkaufspreis erreicht ist. Der Käufer hat den Kaufpreis binnen 8 Tagen nach dem Zuschlag zu bezahlen. 

•Kaufpreis: Bei Kunstobjekten, die der Differenzbesteuerung unterliegen, besteht der Kaufpreis aus dem Meistbot zuzüglich der Käuferprovision von 28 %. Bei Kunstobjekten, die der Normalbesteuerung (mit ▲ gekennzeichnet) unterliegen, besteht der Kaufpreis aus dem Meistbot zuzüglich der Käuferprovision von 24 % und zuzüglich der Umsatzsteuer (13 % bei Bildern, 20 % bei Antiquitäten). Bei € 300.000 übersteigenden Meistboten wird eine Käuferprovision von 20 % (Differenzbesteuerung) bzw. 17 % (Normalbesteuerung) verrechnet.

•Folgerecht: Bei Kunstobjekten, die im Katalog mit einem * gekennzeichnet sind, wird zusätzlich zum Kaufpreis die Folgerechtsabgabe verrechnet. Sie beträgt 4 % von den ersten € 50.000 des Meistbotes, 3 % von den weiteren € 150.000, 1 % von den weiteren € 150.000, 0,5 % von den weiteren € 150.000 und 0,25 % von allen ­weiteren, also € 500.000 übersteigenden Meistboten, jedoch insgesamt nicht mehr als € 12.500. Bei Meistboten von weniger als € 2.500 entfällt die Folgerechtsabgabe. 

•Kaufaufträge: Interessenten können auch schriftliche Kaufaufträge abgeben oder telefonisch mitbieten oder den Sensal mit dem Mitbieten beauftragen. Dafür muss dem Auktionshaus zeitgerecht das unterfertigte, dem Katalog bei-liegende Kaufauftragsformular übersandt worden sein. 

•Telefonische Gebote: Das Auktionshaus wird unter der ihm bekanntgegebenen Nummer eine Verbindung herzustellen trachten. Für das Zustandekommen einer Verbindung übernimmt das Auktionshaus keine Haftung.

•Online Bidding: Interessenten können an Auktionen auch über das Internet teilnehmen. Die Bestimmungen über die unmittelbare Teilnahme an Auktionsveranstaltungen gelten hierfür sinngemäß. Für das Zustandekommen einer Internetverbindung übernimmt das Auktionshaus keine Haftung. 

• Gerichtsstand, Rechtswahl: Die zwischen allen an der Auktion Beteiligten bestehenden Rechtsbeziehungen unterliegen österreichischem materiellem Recht. Als Gerichtsstand wird das für den 1. Wiener Gemeindebezirk örtlich zuständige Gericht vereinbart.

 

See Full Terms And Conditions